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kaijubrains:

whatthefauna:

A small opening in the central disk of a brittle star serves both as mouth and anus. Brittle stars are primarily scavengers, and they use their long, flexible arms to bring food towards the orifice, alternately ingesting and egesting organic matter.
Image credit: NOAA Ocean Explorer

Good ol’ buttmouth

kaijubrains:

whatthefauna:

A small opening in the central disk of a brittle star serves both as mouth and anus. Brittle stars are primarily scavengers, and they use their long, flexible arms to bring food towards the orifice, alternately ingesting and egesting organic matter.

Image credit: NOAA Ocean Explorer

Good ol’ buttmouth

magictransistor:

Érik Desmazières, The Library of Babel (Aquatints and etchings), 1941.

myqueertestimony:

NATIVE YOUTH SEXUAL HEALTH NETWORK, North America (www.nativeyouthsexualhealth.com)

Campaign Titled: Healthy Sexuality and Fighting Homophobia: Native Youth Photography Project

About the Project:

This is the first national campaign for First Nations youth across Canada to fight homophobia and normalize healthy sexuality!

First Nations youth from across Canada came together in March 2010 to create a national campaign about sexuality and fighting homophobia. These are the images created from the campaign which can be utilized as posters, postcards, as well as community newspaper inserts for articles and awareness.

About the Organization:

The Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) is a North-America wide organization working on issues of healthy sexuality, cultural competency, youth empowerment, reproductive justice, and sex positivity by and for Native youth.

The reclamation and revitalization of traditional knowledge about people’s fundamental human rights over their bodies and spaces, intersected with present-day realities is fundamental to our work.

We work within the full spectrum of reproductive and sexual health for Indigenous peoples.

*Connect with more QUEER STORIES from all over the world here!

realmonstrosities:

Swimming snails and their gelatinous, winged feet!

These are all snails who’ve given up on life slipping and sliding along the sea floor and have grown fins so they can swim through the ocean.

There are Sea Butterflies who keep their shell and come in all sorts of shapes and sizes;

Sea Angels who lose their shell at an early age and look more like slugs;

Atlantids who are microscopic and have a large, coiled shell;

And Sea Elephants, some of whom have a teeny shell that looks more like a hat and others who lose their shell completely.

I’m so glad to see that snails have such options!

allcreatures:

Sociable weavers construct permanent nests on trees and other tall objects. These nests are the largest built by any bird, and are large enough to house over a hundred pairs of birds, containing several generations at a time. The nests consist of separate chambers, each of which is occupied by a pair (sometimes with offspring) roost and breed.

Picture: Dillon Marsh / Rex Features (via Tiny weaver birds make huge nests on telegraph poles in the Kalahari desert - Telegraph)

geomilligan:

The recent heavy rain has brought out the fungi.